What is Many Black and Asian Americans Say

What is Many Black and Asian Americans Say

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It still has far-reaching health and economic consequences for the American public. But for many, especially Americans of Asian and Asian descent, the effects go beyond medical and financial concerns. About four in ten black and Asian adults say people have acted as if they were uncomfortable around them because of their race or ethnicity since the start of the outbreak, and similar posts say they are concerned that other people might be suspicious of them if they wear a mask when out in public.

Black Americans and Asians are also more likely than their white and Hispanic counterparts to say they were subjected to slander or jokes because of their race or ethnicity, but Asian adults are the most likely to say this has happened to them since the beginning
About three in ten Asian adults (31%) say they have been slandered or joked because of their race or ethnicity since the outbreak began, compared to 21% of black adults, 15% of Hispanic adults and 8% of whites. grown ups.

Meanwhile, about half of black Americans (51%) said they heard expressions of support because of their race or ethnicity since nearly three in ten Hispanics (29%) and Asians (28%) said the same. . The survey was conducted as demonstrations continued across the country protesting the death of George Floyd, a black man killed while in Minneapolis police custody.

Besides the personal experiences of different groups, about four in ten American adults (39%) say it is more common for people to express racist or insensitive views of racism about Asian people than it was before, while 30% say it is more It’s common for people to express these views toward black people. Younger participants say that, compared to before the outbreak, it is common for people to express racist or insensitive views of racism about Hispanics (19%) or whites (14%). Asian Americans, who make up 6% of the United States’ population, are the fastest-growing major racial or ethnic group in the United States, Hispanics make up 18% of the total population, and Black Americans make up 12%.

A majority of Asian adults (58%) say it is more common for people to express racist or insensitive views of racism about Asian people than it was before four in ten white, black, and Spanish adults said this is more common now. And a large proportion of black adults (45%) say it is more common for people to express racist views of blacks than before the outbreak, than for opinions from whites, Latinos and Asians who say the same thing.

About four in ten Asians (39%) and blacks (38%) – and 27% of Hispanic adults – say that someone has acted uncomfortable around them because of their race or ethnicity since then. Only 13% of white adults say this has happened to them.

When asked about other negative situations they may have been in because of their race or ethnicity since the pandemic, Asian and black adults are more likely than Hispanic and white adults to say they have been subjected to slander or joke or fear that someone will threaten or physically attack them because of their race or ethnicity.

Asian Americans are more likely than any other group to say they have experienced insults or jokes because of their race or ethnicity since 31% said this has happened to them, compared with 21% of black adults, and 15% of Hispanic adults, 8%. Of white adults. About a quarter (26%) of Asian Americans and 20% of black Americans say they fear that someone will threaten or physically attack them, more than the shares of white Americans and Hispanic Americans.

Black adults younger than 50 years old are more likely to say they have had these experiences than older black adults. For example, 44% of black adults in the younger age group say people have acted as if they are uncomfortable around them since the start of the pandemic, compared to 30% of black adults 50 years of age or older. 25% say they have been insulted or joked because of race or ethnicity since (vs. 15%).

Black men (49%) are more likely to say than black women (31%) that someone acted as if they were uncomfortable around them. Black men are also more likely to say they fear being threatened or physically attacked because of their race or ethnicity (27% versus 15% of black women).

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